hiphopstartedoutintheheart:

When I came across this picture I have to admit I chuckled. Thinking about it a little deeper, I found this to be connected to the whole “Hip-Hop is dead” idea. Hopefully we all know Nas was referring to the overpowering influence of capitalism in the commodification of Hip-Hop. Something we always talked about in my Hip-Hop and Politics class is the act of countering the radio musics hegemony.
We’re lazy! That’s what it boils down to. We can let older generations, or even pessimistic members of our generation bash Hip-hop, but the truth is that they’re just lazy. Hip-Hop started as being the narrative of the struggles of low socioeconomic status youth. It’s our responsibility to look for and maintain that narrative attached with Hip-Hop. Hip-Hop does not equal rapping, and I think the favorite rappers this person is referring to are the obvious like Pac and Biggie. They were more than just rappers, they were a testimony to a struggle not unique to just them but common among oppressed black and brown youth. It seems like they were the last voice of the people in the public eye. However, it’s up to us to look for the rappers that do not get featured in channels owned by the white CEO’s. It’s up to us to look for the rappers that share our struggle, the 99% not disguised by the chains and the cars and the [young] money.



“It’s up to us to look for the rappers that do not get featured in channels owned by the white CEO’s. It’s up to us to look for the rappers that share our struggle, the 99% not disguised by the chains and the cars and the [young] money.”

Real talk, yo.  I think we can be kind of lazy when it comes to finding music, so a lot of people only stick with what’s given to them instead of going out and seeking more options.  Forreal though…damn near everybody raps nowadays, so are you trying to say that there’s only a handful of rappers that are worth listening to?  Shoot, there’s a good chance one of your co-workers might be a rapper.

hiphopstartedoutintheheart:

When I came across this picture I have to admit I chuckled. Thinking about it a little deeper, I found this to be connected to the whole “Hip-Hop is dead” idea. Hopefully we all know Nas was referring to the overpowering influence of capitalism in the commodification of Hip-Hop. Something we always talked about in my Hip-Hop and Politics class is the act of countering the radio musics hegemony.

We’re lazy! That’s what it boils down to. We can let older generations, or even pessimistic members of our generation bash Hip-hop, but the truth is that they’re just lazy. Hip-Hop started as being the narrative of the struggles of low socioeconomic status youth. It’s our responsibility to look for and maintain that narrative attached with Hip-Hop. Hip-Hop does not equal rapping, and I think the favorite rappers this person is referring to are the obvious like Pac and Biggie. They were more than just rappers, they were a testimony to a struggle not unique to just them but common among oppressed black and brown youth. It seems like they were the last voice of the people in the public eye. However, it’s up to us to look for the rappers that do not get featured in channels owned by the white CEO’s. It’s up to us to look for the rappers that share our struggle, the 99% not disguised by the chains and the cars and the [young] money.

It’s up to us to look for the rappers that do not get featured in channels owned by the white CEO’s. It’s up to us to look for the rappers that share our struggle, the 99% not disguised by the chains and the cars and the [young] money.

Real talk, yo. I think we can be kind of lazy when it comes to finding music, so a lot of people only stick with what’s given to them instead of going out and seeking more options. Forreal though…damn near everybody raps nowadays, so are you trying to say that there’s only a handful of rappers that are worth listening to? Shoot, there’s a good chance one of your co-workers might be a rapper.

(via periodstains)

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    (REBLOGGED BY THE RAWEST CLUB FOLLOW AND SUBMIT YOUR MUSIC)
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    WORD. What ever happened to the lure of exploration? Search and you might discover something worthwhile. There are...
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    “It’s up to us to look for the rappers that do not get featured in channels owned by the white CEO’s. It’s up to us to...
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