hiphopstartedoutintheheart:

When I came across this picture I have to admit I chuckled. Thinking about it a little deeper, I found this to be connected to the whole “Hip-Hop is dead” idea. Hopefully we all know Nas was referring to the overpowering influence of capitalism in the commodification of Hip-Hop. Something we always talked about in my Hip-Hop and Politics class is the act of countering the radio musics hegemony.
We’re lazy! That’s what it boils down to. We can let older generations, or even pessimistic members of our generation bash Hip-hop, but the truth is that they’re just lazy. Hip-Hop started as being the narrative of the struggles of low socioeconomic status youth. It’s our responsibility to look for and maintain that narrative attached with Hip-Hop. Hip-Hop does not equal rapping, and I think the favorite rappers this person is referring to are the obvious like Pac and Biggie. They were more than just rappers, they were a testimony to a struggle not unique to just them but common among oppressed black and brown youth. It seems like they were the last voice of the people in the public eye. However, it’s up to us to look for the rappers that do not get featured in channels owned by the white CEO’s. It’s up to us to look for the rappers that share our struggle, the 99% not disguised by the chains and the cars and the [young] money.



“It’s up to us to look for the rappers that do not get featured in channels owned by the white CEO’s. It’s up to us to look for the rappers that share our struggle, the 99% not disguised by the chains and the cars and the [young] money.”

Real talk, yo.  I think we can be kind of lazy when it comes to finding music, so a lot of people only stick with what’s given to them instead of going out and seeking more options.  Forreal though…damn near everybody raps nowadays, so are you trying to say that there’s only a handful of rappers that are worth listening to?  Shoot, there’s a good chance one of your co-workers might be a rapper.

hiphopstartedoutintheheart:

When I came across this picture I have to admit I chuckled. Thinking about it a little deeper, I found this to be connected to the whole “Hip-Hop is dead” idea. Hopefully we all know Nas was referring to the overpowering influence of capitalism in the commodification of Hip-Hop. Something we always talked about in my Hip-Hop and Politics class is the act of countering the radio musics hegemony.

We’re lazy! That’s what it boils down to. We can let older generations, or even pessimistic members of our generation bash Hip-hop, but the truth is that they’re just lazy. Hip-Hop started as being the narrative of the struggles of low socioeconomic status youth. It’s our responsibility to look for and maintain that narrative attached with Hip-Hop. Hip-Hop does not equal rapping, and I think the favorite rappers this person is referring to are the obvious like Pac and Biggie. They were more than just rappers, they were a testimony to a struggle not unique to just them but common among oppressed black and brown youth. It seems like they were the last voice of the people in the public eye. However, it’s up to us to look for the rappers that do not get featured in channels owned by the white CEO’s. It’s up to us to look for the rappers that share our struggle, the 99% not disguised by the chains and the cars and the [young] money.

It’s up to us to look for the rappers that do not get featured in channels owned by the white CEO’s. It’s up to us to look for the rappers that share our struggle, the 99% not disguised by the chains and the cars and the [young] money.

Real talk, yo. I think we can be kind of lazy when it comes to finding music, so a lot of people only stick with what’s given to them instead of going out and seeking more options. Forreal though…damn near everybody raps nowadays, so are you trying to say that there’s only a handful of rappers that are worth listening to? Shoot, there’s a good chance one of your co-workers might be a rapper.

(via periodstains)

eelinejenilee:


Land is life | Hacienda Luisita, Tarlac, Philippines | July 2011
November 16 marks the 7th anniversary of the Hacienda Luisita Massacre. In 2004, the farm workers of Luisita went on a labor strike demanding fairer wages, above the 9.50 pesos/day they currently made, increased benefits, and equal distribution of the land that farmers have worked on for centuries. 12 young farmers and 2 children, all who were unarmed, were killed when Philippine police and military forces were dispatched to break up the strike. This was the worst slaughter of Fillipino workers in years. No one was made accountable for these injustices.
This past summer on my Exposure trip, I got to visit Hacienda Luisita. The people there are still traumatized by the massacre. I listened to their compelling stories of the Luisita martyrs and how the farmers today are still getting harassed by the military and police. I saw what their conditions are currently like. Until the government distributes land to the landless, peasant farmers will always be peacefully protesting against exploitation and demanding justice to the victims and families of the massacre. 

eelinejenilee:

Land is life | Hacienda Luisita, Tarlac, Philippines | July 2011

November 16 marks the 7th anniversary of the Hacienda Luisita Massacre. In 2004, the farm workers of Luisita went on a labor strike demanding fairer wages, above the 9.50 pesos/day they currently made, increased benefits, and equal distribution of the land that farmers have worked on for centuries. 12 young farmers and 2 children, all who were unarmed, were killed when Philippine police and military forces were dispatched to break up the strike. This was the worst slaughter of Fillipino workers in years. No one was made accountable for these injustices.

This past summer on my Exposure trip, I got to visit Hacienda Luisita. The people there are still traumatized by the massacre. I listened to their compelling stories of the Luisita martyrs and how the farmers today are still getting harassed by the military and police. I saw what their conditions are currently like. Until the government distributes land to the landless, peasant farmers will always be peacefully protesting against exploitation and demanding justice to the victims and families of the massacre. 

(via cultureofsound)