Solidarity to all the people fighting for their freedom and basic human rights. Land is Life.

Heard a whole entire people gasp when Manny got knocked out
I get it, but let it be said from the mouth of a Pinoy
We should gasp ten fold as a whole when a boy
In the Philippines has to sniff a whole bag of glue
Cuz it’s cheaper to be high than get a spoonful of food

One year…

Exactly one year ago, right around this time of night, my flight was just taking off from LAX and headed to the Philippines as I prepared myself to experience the land where my family and ancestors came from. A few short weeks after that, it was time to reflect on everything I experienced in the Motherland. Looking back on what I wrote, there was one part that stood out for me:

I’d like to say that this was a life changing experience (which it does feel like right now), but I think that can only be assessed on a more long term basis. What will happen months from now after I’ve gone back to my comfortable life in the States? Will I get caught up in all the distractions? Or will I be more grounded and inspired to keep organizing and keep fighting for the people?

Living in a capitalist country with a culture based on consumerism, I’m in a never-ending remolding process, but for the most part, I feel like my experience last year really was a life changing experience. There’s so much more I can write, but I’ll just leave it on that note.

The newly elected Executive Committee for Anakbayan Los Angeles, from left to right: Solidarity Officer, Chairperson, Vice-Chair, Education Officer, Secretary General, (not pictured) Finance Officer.

After attending today’s General Assembly, I feel reenergized and inspired once again.  After hearing what everyone had to say throughout the day, I once again realized that although I sometimes wish I had more leisure time, there’s no other place I’d rather be than in the struggle and in the movement.   Just two short years ago, I was really indecisive about getting involved in the work, but now that I’m immersed in it, it’s tough to imagine what my life was like before organizing.

On a personal note, I’m really excited for my new role as Secretary General.  Ever since I joined Anakbayan LA, I’ve always been in the Finance committee and also served as the Finance Officer for the last year. Although I’m a little nervous about getting out of my comfort zone, I’m also very eager to hit the ground running and fully accept the tasks that lie ahead. It’s always an honor to be nominated and elected by such a dedicated, selfless group of people, so it’s a role that I don’t take lightly.

I’m looking forward to not only my own personal growth, but also by playing a part in the development of all our kasamas.  In order for us to advance and keep moving forward, we have to grow together. The last couple years have really shown me the importance of what it means to be in a collective, and I feel that anyone who thinks he/she can be the cause of large scale change on an individual level is misguided in their thinking.

I know that there will be challenges we’ll have to face along the way, but that’s always going to happen.  However, seeing how our chapter (which is part of a larger national organization) has grown over the years, both with our members and overall presence in the community, I have the utmost confidence that we’ll overcome those challenges and continue pushing forward.

SERVE THE PEOPLE

The newly elected Executive Committee for Anakbayan Los Angeles, from left to right: Solidarity Officer, Chairperson, Vice-Chair, Education Officer, Secretary General, (not pictured) Finance Officer.

After attending today’s General Assembly, I feel reenergized and inspired once again. After hearing what everyone had to say throughout the day, I once again realized that although I sometimes wish I had more leisure time, there’s no other place I’d rather be than in the struggle and in the movement. Just two short years ago, I was really indecisive about getting involved in the work, but now that I’m immersed in it, it’s tough to imagine what my life was like before organizing.

On a personal note, I’m really excited for my new role as Secretary General. Ever since I joined Anakbayan LA, I’ve always been in the Finance committee and also served as the Finance Officer for the last year. Although I’m a little nervous about getting out of my comfort zone, I’m also very eager to hit the ground running and fully accept the tasks that lie ahead. It’s always an honor to be nominated and elected by such a dedicated, selfless group of people, so it’s a role that I don’t take lightly.

I’m looking forward to not only my own personal growth, but also by playing a part in the development of all our kasamas. In order for us to advance and keep moving forward, we have to grow together. The last couple years have really shown me the importance of what it means to be in a collective, and I feel that anyone who thinks he/she can be the cause of large scale change on an individual level is misguided in their thinking.

I know that there will be challenges we’ll have to face along the way, but that’s always going to happen. However, seeing how our chapter (which is part of a larger national organization) has grown over the years, both with our members and overall presence in the community, I have the utmost confidence that we’ll overcome those challenges and continue pushing forward.

SERVE THE PEOPLE

superhusbandslove:


*TRIGGER WARNING FOR TORTURE*
akoaykayumanggi:

dinosaurusgede:

That’s horrible ;___; 
…the water-torture…

Ugh. Coke. Like seriously. =.=
Anyway, things that the U.S. did to Filipin@’s during their colonial rule, number two. The water cure torture. Yup.
Ohhhhhh! And not to mention Theodore Roosevelt AGREED to this and said it was fine to do it, saying that it was an old Filipin@ method (ya right).

“The water cure is an old Filipino method of mild torture. Nobody was seriously damaged whereas the Filipinos had inflicted incredible tortures on our people.”.

Yup. U.S. colonial history folks. And do not get me started on the other groups of people they colonized like Hawai’ians, because I can go on all night with this.

Ugh, this is disgusting.

superhusbandslove:

*TRIGGER WARNING FOR TORTURE*

akoaykayumanggi:

dinosaurusgede:

That’s horrible ;___; 

…the water-torture…

Ugh. Coke. Like seriously. =.=

Anyway, things that the U.S. did to Filipin@’s during their colonial rule, number two. The water cure torture. Yup.

Ohhhhhh! And not to mention Theodore Roosevelt AGREED to this and said it was fine to do it, saying that it was an old Filipin@ method (ya right).

“The water cure is an old Filipino method of mild torture. Nobody was seriously damaged whereas the Filipinos had inflicted incredible tortures on our people.”.

Yup. U.S. colonial history folks. And do not get me started on the other groups of people they colonized like Hawai’ians, because I can go on all night with this.

Ugh, this is disgusting.

(via soulfuldaze)

phatlip:


Today is the Day of the Disappeared.In 2 years of Noynoy Aquino’s presidency, there have been 99 victims of extrajudicial killings and 11 enforced disappearances.
In 2011, an extrajudicial killing happened almost every week in the #Philippines.
As of June 30 2012, there are 385 political prisoners in detention centers and military facilities all over the #Philippines. 
Under Aquino, killings of environmentalists & land rights activists has increased #RIPGeertman #RIPPalispis #DayoftheDisappeared 
From 2001 to 2010 there were 1,206 victims of extrajudicial killings & 206 victims of enforced disappearances under former Pres. Arroyo.
Human Rights group @karapatan has documented 170 political prisoners arrested and detained in the two years of Noynoy’s presidency.

5 of 9 extrajudicial killings in the #Philippines, from Jan-June 12 occurred because of military indiscriminate firing. #DayoftheDisappeared
Of the 99 victims of extrajudicial killings in the last 2 years, 53 were peasants. #DayoftheDisappeared
Students Sherlyn Cadapan and Karen Empeno disappeared on June 26, 2006. They are still missing. And their captors have yet to be tried.

phatlip:

Today is the Day of the Disappeared.

  • In 2 years of Noynoy Aquino’s presidency, there have been 99 victims of extrajudicial killings and 11 enforced disappearances.

  • In 2011, an extrajudicial killing happened almost every week in the #Philippines.

  • As of June 30 2012, there are 385 political prisoners in detention centers and military facilities all over the #Philippines. 

  • Under Aquino, killings of environmentalists & land rights activists has increased #RIPGeertman #RIPPalispis #DayoftheDisappeared 

  • From 2001 to 2010 there were 1,206 victims of extrajudicial killings & 206 victims of enforced disappearances under former Pres. Arroyo.

  • Human Rights group @karapatan has documented 170 political prisoners arrested and detained in the two years of Noynoy’s presidency.
  • 5 of 9 extrajudicial killings in the #Philippines, from Jan-June 12 occurred because of military indiscriminate firing. #DayoftheDisappeared

  • Of the 99 victims of extrajudicial killings in the last 2 years, 53 were peasants. #DayoftheDisappeared
  • Students Sherlyn Cadapan and Karen Empeno disappeared on June 26, 2006. They are still missing. And their captors have yet to be tried.

(via cinemilitancy-deactivated201301)

Organizing work…

I’ve come a long way in the 1.5+ years that I’ve been an organizer with Anakbayan LA. Prior to joining, I was on the fence for a really long time (maybe two years?), so now I can’t help but laugh at that indecisive period because it’s almost impossible to envision my life without organizing.

However, since I just started a new job, my amount of free time has decreased due to a longer commute and longer work hours (I’m out the door at 7am and don’t get back home until 7pm), but I’d be lying if I said there’s not enough time in the day to complete my organizing tasks. I can still do the work, I just need to learn how to be more efficient with what little “free” time I do have. It can definitely be done though!

These next few weeks are going to be crazy busy though (more than normal), and I can’t help but feel a little overwhelmed right now. Luckily, some kasamas and I recently had an E.D. (Educational Discussion) about the qualities of a revolutionary, which I revisited tonight to keep myself grounded and have the right approach to what needs to be done.

Here are some bullet points on the article we studied:

  • A revolutionary is lively and enthusiastic. We must keep a positive mental attitude and eagerness in the work and be conscious that every step brings us closer to the bright future.

  • Don’t allow ourselves to lose spirit or be discouraged in the face of problems and difficulties. With militance and a fighting sprit, we must seize every moment and opportunity in the struggle.

  • Initiative is a mark of the revolutionary. Our initiative applies not only to our own responsibilities, but also to other areas where we see the need for immediate attention.

  • Always willing to take on tasks and responsibilities and accepts assignments with little concern for the hard work or sacrifices they entail. We shouldn’t be choosy with the work because we do not seek fame or comfort for ourselves.

Like I said in the beginning, I’ve come a long way as an organizer but I’m also aware of what shortcomings I have and what areas I need to improve on. It’s a never ending growth process, but I’m in it for the long haul and ready to step it up even more than what I’ve done in the past. Let’s keep marching forward…