peoplepowermovement:

We commemorate the legacy of El Hajj Malik El Shabazz, also known as Malcolm X, on the day he was assassinated, February 21st, 1965.

Words cannot describe his revolutionary contributions to the struggle for liberation and self-determination. We can only witness the products of his words and actions in the work that goes on to this day by warriors who he inspired to fight and free us all from what Malcolm called, “this miserable condition that exists on this earth.”

We must see in our organizing work that there are thousands upon thousands of potential Malcolm X’s, from the rotten schools to the prisons. There is hope.

He famously said, “If you don’t stand for something, you will fall for anything.” So we ask you, where do you stand in the face of injustice?

Rest in Power Malcolm. You will never die as long as we fight for the change you hoped to see. ALL POWER TO THE PEOPLE!

(via xulaxicana)

Taken from a kasama’s facebook page:

"Just some of the #Haiyanrelief #YolandPH #TaskforceHaiyan #Nafcon events, fundraisers and activities that’s been happening across the U.S. Love, solidarity and people power for community led relief efforts for the victims and survivors of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. Please support Nafconusa.org. Thank you."

Taken from a kasama’s facebook page:

"Just some of the #Haiyanrelief #YolandPH #TaskforceHaiyan #Nafcon events, fundraisers and activities that’s been happening across the U.S. Love, solidarity and people power for community led relief efforts for the victims and survivors of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. Please support Nafconusa.org. Thank you."

One year…

Exactly one year ago, right around this time of night, my flight was just taking off from LAX and headed to the Philippines as I prepared myself to experience the land where my family and ancestors came from. A few short weeks after that, it was time to reflect on everything I experienced in the Motherland. Looking back on what I wrote, there was one part that stood out for me:

I’d like to say that this was a life changing experience (which it does feel like right now), but I think that can only be assessed on a more long term basis. What will happen months from now after I’ve gone back to my comfortable life in the States? Will I get caught up in all the distractions? Or will I be more grounded and inspired to keep organizing and keep fighting for the people?

Living in a capitalist country with a culture based on consumerism, I’m in a never-ending remolding process, but for the most part, I feel like my experience last year really was a life changing experience. There’s so much more I can write, but I’ll just leave it on that note.

The newly elected Executive Committee for Anakbayan Los Angeles, from left to right: Solidarity Officer, Chairperson, Vice-Chair, Education Officer, Secretary General, (not pictured) Finance Officer.

After attending today’s General Assembly, I feel reenergized and inspired once again.  After hearing what everyone had to say throughout the day, I once again realized that although I sometimes wish I had more leisure time, there’s no other place I’d rather be than in the struggle and in the movement.   Just two short years ago, I was really indecisive about getting involved in the work, but now that I’m immersed in it, it’s tough to imagine what my life was like before organizing.

On a personal note, I’m really excited for my new role as Secretary General.  Ever since I joined Anakbayan LA, I’ve always been in the Finance committee and also served as the Finance Officer for the last year. Although I’m a little nervous about getting out of my comfort zone, I’m also very eager to hit the ground running and fully accept the tasks that lie ahead. It’s always an honor to be nominated and elected by such a dedicated, selfless group of people, so it’s a role that I don’t take lightly.

I’m looking forward to not only my own personal growth, but also by playing a part in the development of all our kasamas.  In order for us to advance and keep moving forward, we have to grow together. The last couple years have really shown me the importance of what it means to be in a collective, and I feel that anyone who thinks he/she can be the cause of large scale change on an individual level is misguided in their thinking.

I know that there will be challenges we’ll have to face along the way, but that’s always going to happen.  However, seeing how our chapter (which is part of a larger national organization) has grown over the years, both with our members and overall presence in the community, I have the utmost confidence that we’ll overcome those challenges and continue pushing forward.

SERVE THE PEOPLE

The newly elected Executive Committee for Anakbayan Los Angeles, from left to right: Solidarity Officer, Chairperson, Vice-Chair, Education Officer, Secretary General, (not pictured) Finance Officer.

After attending today’s General Assembly, I feel reenergized and inspired once again. After hearing what everyone had to say throughout the day, I once again realized that although I sometimes wish I had more leisure time, there’s no other place I’d rather be than in the struggle and in the movement. Just two short years ago, I was really indecisive about getting involved in the work, but now that I’m immersed in it, it’s tough to imagine what my life was like before organizing.

On a personal note, I’m really excited for my new role as Secretary General. Ever since I joined Anakbayan LA, I’ve always been in the Finance committee and also served as the Finance Officer for the last year. Although I’m a little nervous about getting out of my comfort zone, I’m also very eager to hit the ground running and fully accept the tasks that lie ahead. It’s always an honor to be nominated and elected by such a dedicated, selfless group of people, so it’s a role that I don’t take lightly.

I’m looking forward to not only my own personal growth, but also by playing a part in the development of all our kasamas. In order for us to advance and keep moving forward, we have to grow together. The last couple years have really shown me the importance of what it means to be in a collective, and I feel that anyone who thinks he/she can be the cause of large scale change on an individual level is misguided in their thinking.

I know that there will be challenges we’ll have to face along the way, but that’s always going to happen. However, seeing how our chapter (which is part of a larger national organization) has grown over the years, both with our members and overall presence in the community, I have the utmost confidence that we’ll overcome those challenges and continue pushing forward.

SERVE THE PEOPLE

anakbayanla:

Anakbayan LA 2012 Voter GuideVote for the people’s interests!

anakbayanla:

Anakbayan LA 2012 Voter Guide
Vote for the people’s interests!

Organizing work…

I’ve come a long way in the 1.5+ years that I’ve been an organizer with Anakbayan LA. Prior to joining, I was on the fence for a really long time (maybe two years?), so now I can’t help but laugh at that indecisive period because it’s almost impossible to envision my life without organizing.

However, since I just started a new job, my amount of free time has decreased due to a longer commute and longer work hours (I’m out the door at 7am and don’t get back home until 7pm), but I’d be lying if I said there’s not enough time in the day to complete my organizing tasks. I can still do the work, I just need to learn how to be more efficient with what little “free” time I do have. It can definitely be done though!

These next few weeks are going to be crazy busy though (more than normal), and I can’t help but feel a little overwhelmed right now. Luckily, some kasamas and I recently had an E.D. (Educational Discussion) about the qualities of a revolutionary, which I revisited tonight to keep myself grounded and have the right approach to what needs to be done.

Here are some bullet points on the article we studied:

  • A revolutionary is lively and enthusiastic. We must keep a positive mental attitude and eagerness in the work and be conscious that every step brings us closer to the bright future.

  • Don’t allow ourselves to lose spirit or be discouraged in the face of problems and difficulties. With militance and a fighting sprit, we must seize every moment and opportunity in the struggle.

  • Initiative is a mark of the revolutionary. Our initiative applies not only to our own responsibilities, but also to other areas where we see the need for immediate attention.

  • Always willing to take on tasks and responsibilities and accepts assignments with little concern for the hard work or sacrifices they entail. We shouldn’t be choosy with the work because we do not seek fame or comfort for ourselves.

Like I said in the beginning, I’ve come a long way as an organizer but I’m also aware of what shortcomings I have and what areas I need to improve on. It’s a never ending growth process, but I’m in it for the long haul and ready to step it up even more than what I’ve done in the past. Let’s keep marching forward…

withrevolutionarycries:


blunthought:

Bobby Seale looking over bags of food being donated to the black community.

I think it’s telling that folks are more likely to circulate images of the BPP holding guns than they are of them passing out food. Even folks who supposedly support/ed the party. Guns are sexy and ~political~and virulent and masculine—groceries bags of food—that’s not what revolution is about. Except, that’s exactly what revolution is about.

withrevolutionarycries:

blunthought:

Bobby Seale looking over bags of food being donated to the black community.

I think it’s telling that folks are more likely to circulate images of the BPP holding guns than they are of them passing out food. Even folks who supposedly support/ed the party. Guns are sexy and ~political~and virulent and masculine—groceries bags of food—that’s not what revolution is about. Except, that’s exactly what revolution is about.

(via manilaryce)

As a lot of you might already know, I went on an exposure trip (like this one) in the Philippines last December.

The young woman speaking in this video was also my expo guide. Although I can only understand a very small percentage of what she’s saying here, you can hear it in her voice and see it in her body language that she’s really dedicated to the movement and embodies the spirit of “Serving the People”. Compared to other U.S. kasamas who’ve participated in similar exposure programs in the Philippines, my 4-day expo trip was relatively short, but it was still a life changing experience.

From the time that I met her in Manila to the bus ride to our destination in the Laguna province (Southern Tagalog region), I was immediately impressed with her knowledge about the various places we passed through as well as her sharp political analysis overall. As we were walking through the various neighborhoods, it was amazing to see how almost everyone knew her, which really demonstrated her ability to integrate with the masses and be able to relate to them — a trait that all organizers should constantly practice (and something that I’m consciously working on). In my head, I was thinking that this wasn’t just some armchair activist who’s detached from the people…she really knew what was going on with everyone we encountered — from the deep/political stuff all the way down to catching up on the latest soap opera drama. The way that everyone’s face lit up when seeing her was a testament of the time that she has dedicated to getting to know The People.

I can go on for days, but I’ll just say that she really is an inspiration and someone who I’m proud to call a kasama. To be honest, I’ve felt myself slipping with the organizing work the last couple of weeks by getting caught up in various distractions, but seeing this video of her and reflecting on my overall experience in the Philippines has breathed new life in me.

Let’s keep the movement moving, y’all…

Although I don’t write about it as much as I used to, I still think about my trip to the Philippines this past December and the lasting impact that it’s had on me.  One of my biggest fears after coming back from my exposure trip (just like the one in this video) was completely losing myself and forgetting about everyone I met and everything I experienced in the Motherland.

Living in the belly of the beast and enjoying the 1st World privileges it bestows upon us, whether willingly or unwillingly, it’s a constant battle to maintain that vision (for me at least). A couple weeks ago I bought some kicks online, but caught myself justifying my actions because it was a 2 for 1 sale.  I’ve got a closet full of shoes, with a couple I haven’t even worn yet (wtf?!), but yet I still felt it was necessary to buy more. I guess I didn’t do a good job of resisting the temptation after all.

Whenever I catch myself falling deeper into that capitalist trap, I go through the photos and video footage I took while I was in the Philippines to remind myself of what’s really important.  When I came across the picture posted above, it helped me regain my footing and become grounded once again in the principles of the movement and provided some much needed perspective as I navigate through the contradictions and distractions.

Although I don’t write about it as much as I used to, I still think about my trip to the Philippines this past December and the lasting impact that it’s had on me. One of my biggest fears after coming back from my exposure trip (just like the one in this video) was completely losing myself and forgetting about everyone I met and everything I experienced in the Motherland.

Living in the belly of the beast and enjoying the 1st World privileges it bestows upon us, whether willingly or unwillingly, it’s a constant battle to maintain that vision (for me at least). A couple weeks ago I bought some kicks online, but caught myself justifying my actions because it was a 2 for 1 sale. I’ve got a closet full of shoes, with a couple I haven’t even worn yet (wtf?!), but yet I still felt it was necessary to buy more. I guess I didn’t do a good job of resisting the temptation after all.

Whenever I catch myself falling deeper into that capitalist trap, I go through the photos and video footage I took while I was in the Philippines to remind myself of what’s really important. When I came across the picture posted above, it helped me regain my footing and become grounded once again in the principles of the movement and provided some much needed perspective as I navigate through the contradictions and distractions.

Chicago: Part One…

I don’t know if it’s because I’m still trying to catch up on all the sleep I missed out on or if I’m slightly overwhelmed by everything that happened in Chicago this weekend, but I’m having a difficult time putting the whole experience into words — there’s just so much to talk about!!

The way I feel right now is exactly how I felt when I came back from my exposure trip in the Philippines. Meeting kasamas (comrades) from across the country and seeing the strength and resiliency of our people was an amazing, inspiring, and empowering thing to experience.

This is going to be a multi-part series of blogs because there’s way too much to cover in one post, but a few things come to mind for now:

1.) I love seeing all the new Facebook friendships/connections being formed over the last couple of days. Although social networking can sometimes hinder actual human interaction, I see these new friendships going far beyond the “Add you as a friend but never talk to you again” formula that we often see on Facebook.

2.) It was an honor to be part of the documentation team for the weekend. I still need to learn a lot about photography and filming (especially editing video), but I’m glad that I was able to help out in any way possible. Seeing all the photos and videos that people are posting does have me feeling really anxious to check out the stuff that I shot though. As part of the documentation team, I had to leave my memory cards with the point person so we can consolidate everything in one location, so I’m eagerly awaiting that package in the mail!! lol.

3.) At one point throughout the weekend, there was a photo backdrop setup in one room where people were able to pose with different props and signs. When it was Anakbayan LA’s turn to go up, there was one sign that just spoke to me, “I’m proud to be in the National Democratic Movement”. It’s a beautiful thing to be a part of.